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You are here:-Tag: nuclear legacy
30 06, 2019

Enduring Colonisation: How France’s continuing control of French Polynesian resources violates the international law of self-determination

2019-10-09T09:18:08+13:00June 30th, 2019|Categories: Large Ocean States, Large Ocean States, Pacific Identities, Pacific Identities|Tags: , , , , |

The Pacific Network on Globalisation (PANG), Blue Ocean Law (BOL) and the Allard Law International Justice & Human Rights Clinic (IJHR) at UBC, has released a report highlighting how France’s ongoing control of French Polynesia’s natural resources violates the basic human right of self-determination. Entitled “Enduring Colonisation: How France’s Continuing Control of

9 06, 2019

Nuclear Testing and Racism in the Pacific Islands

2019-10-09T09:13:44+13:00June 9th, 2019|Categories: Large Ocean States, Pacific Identities, Pacific Resilience|Tags: , , , , |

By Nic Maclellan During the Cold War, between 1946 and 1996, the United States, United Kingdom, and France used Oceania as a laboratory for nuclear testing. The deserts and islands of Australia and the Pacific were perceived as vast, “empty” spaces, suitable for the testing of atomic bombs and thermonuclear weapons. More than

30 05, 2019

Nuclear awareness and activism in the Marshall Islands

2019-05-30T12:54:02+13:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: News from Micronesia, Pacific Resilience, Pasifika Rising News, REACH-MI|Tags: , , , |

Madeleine Johnson was a featured speaker during the opening session at the Pacific Resilience Partnership meeting in Suva in May. Below are highlights from her speech. My Grandma was born in 1926 in Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. She was only 20 years old when her family and community were evacuated in

30 05, 2019

The Blue Pacific and the legacies of nuclear testing

2019-10-09T09:02:22+13:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: Large Ocean States, Pacific Resilience|Tags: , , , , , , |

By Patrick Kaiku States in the Pacific islands are small in landmass and population. Their limited terrestrial resources and lack of comparative advantage are compounded by their remoteness from global centres of commerce. This obviously has impacts on the costs of doing business and integration into global trade relations. Their invisibility in international